Places On Earth That Seems Like War Between Science And Nature


phenomena

Have you ever heard about the oldest war between science and nature . well here are some  interesting phenomena about the nature you need to know.

Petrifying Well

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If an object is placed into such a well and left there for a period of weeks or months the object acquires a stony exterior. At one time this property was believed to be a result of magic or witchcraft, but it is an entirely natural phenomenon and due to a process of evaporation and deposition in waters with an unusually high mineral content.

 

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This process of petrifying is not to be confused with petrification wherein the constituent molecules of the original object are replaced (and not merely overlaid) with molecules of stone or mineral.

 

Grüner See (Styria)

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Grüner See (Green Lake) is a lake in Styria, Austria in a village. The lake is surrounded by the Hochschwab Mountains and forests. The clean and clear water comes from the snowmelt from the karst mountains and has a temperature of 6–7 °C (43–45 °F). During winter, the lake is only 1–2 m (3–7 ft) deep and the surrounding area is used as a county park.

 

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The lake was popular among divers who could observe the green meadows in the edge zone of the lake particularly in June when the water is at its highest.  A bridge and a bench could also be found underwater. Furthermore, trails and trees could also be seen underwater.

 

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The lake supports a variety of fauna such as snails, water fleas (Daphnia pulex), small crabs, fly larvae, and different species of trout (Salmo). The flora is not abundant because of the rocky bottom of the lake. Furthermore, the lake’s depth is variable since its inflow comes from snowmelt.

 

Shanay-Timpishka The Boiling River

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The Shanay-Timpishka, also known as La Bomba, is a tributary of the Amazon River, called the “only boiling river in the world”. It is 6.4 km long. It is known for the very high temperature of its waters—from 45°C to nearly 100°C. The name means ‘boiled by the heat of the sun’, though the source of the heat is likely geothermal.

 

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The river is located in the Mayantuyacu sanctuary, part of the Huánuco high forest. The area is inhabited by an Asháninka community.

Andrés Ruzo, a geothermal scientist, has investigated the source of the heat.

 

The Beacon Maracaibo : Never-Ending Lightning Storm

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Catatumbo lightning (Spanish: Relámpago del Catatumbo) is an atmospheric phenomenon in Venezuela. It occurs only over the mouth of the Catatumbo Riverwhere it empties into Lake Maracaibo.

 

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It originates from a mass of storm clouds at a height of more than 1 km, and occurs during 140 to 160 nights a year, 10 hours per day and up to 280 times per hour. It occurs over and around Lake Maracaibo, typically over the bog area formed where the Catatumbo River flows into the lake.

Catatumbo lightning changes its frequency throughout the year, and it is different from year to year. For example, it ceased from January to March 2010, apparently due to drought, temporarily raising fears that it might have been extinguished permanently.

 

The Blue Pond Of Hokkaido

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Blue Pond  is a man-made pond feature in Biei, Hokkaido, Japan. It is the result of works on the Biei River , carried out after the 1988 eruption of Mount Tokachi, to protect the town of Biei from volcanic mudflows. The colour is thought to result from the accidental presence of colloidal aluminium hydroxide in the water.

 

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Damage caused by Typhoon Mindulle in August 2016 resulted in a temporary drop in the water level and in the colour briefly turning brown with mud and sand from the Biei River.

 

The Ringing Rocks

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Ringing rocks, also known as sonorous rocks or lithophonic rocks, are rocks that resonate like a bell when struck, such as the Musical Stones of Skiddaw in the English Lake District; the stones in Ringing Rocks Park

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In Upper Black Eddy, Bucks County, Pennsylvania; the Ringing Rocks of Kiandra, New South Wales; and the Bell Rock Range of Western Australia. Ringing rocks are used in idiophonic musical instruments called lithophones.

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