Anti-Extradition Protesters Have The New Symbol – Here’s Why

“An eye for an eye”


Anti-Extradition Protesters Have The New Symbol - Heres Why

The sit-in protest in Hong Kong international airport continued for a fifth straight day on Tuesday (Aug 13), with protesters using the phrase “an eye for an eye” in protest against excessive police brutality, according to a report by The Straits Times (ST).

  • Protesters in Hong Kong have occupied its airport for five straight days, resulting in closures on Monday (Aug 12) and Tuesday (Aug 13).
  • An image of a bloodied eye and the phrase “an eye for an eye” have emerged as symbols of the latest anti-government protests.
  • The eye is a reference to a female medic who was allegedly blinded in one eye after police shot at the crowd in Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday night (Aug 11).
  • Incensed protesters have rallied behind her injury as a symbol of excess police brutality toward protesters.

As seen on social media videos, anti-extradition protesters chanted the phrase over and over while occupying the airport’s arrival and departure halls. The airport suspended operations a second time on Tuesday evening, after managing to briefly reopen in the morning and afternoon.

“An eye for an eye” took on literal meaning for protesters after a young woman was allegedly blinded in one eye after police fired a projectile into the crowd in Tsim Sha Tsui on Sunday night (Aug 11), ST reported.

The woman – who is believed to be a medic – was injured after the projectile penetrated her safety goggles, with viral photos on social media showing a pair of safety goggles with a beanbag round lodged in them at the spot she was allegedly hit.

What is a beanbag round? Defence technology company Security Devices International defines it as a projectile made of a small fabric pillow filled with lead pellets.

While it is considered a less-lethal weapon, it can cause injuries requiring “medical attention at a hospital” and even death, the company stated on its website.

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