20 The World’s Most Famous Brands Very First Products

Very first steps toward fame!


#6 Computer Apple I (1976)

Computer Apple I (1976)

Founders – S.Jobs, S.Wozniak, R.Wayne

First location – Cupertino, CA

Steve Wozniak originally assembled the microcomputer Apple I in 1975 for a Homebrew Computer Club meeting in Silicon Valley. Wozniak said, that the basic machine was “the first time in history anyone had typed a character on a keyboard and seen it show up on their own computer’s screen right in front of them.”

Another club member, Steve Jobs, helped to sell 50 orders of the machine for $500 each to a local computer store. The success of the sales made the pair over $50,000 for and encouraged them to get to work on the Apple II.

The rest is history.

Source: Wikipedia,www.macworld.co.uk

#7 Search Engine (1998)

Search Engine (1998)

Founders – Larry Page, Sergey Brin

First location – Menlo Park, CA

Google has its origins in “BackRub”, a research project that was begun in 1996 by Larry Page and Sergey Brin when they were both PhD students at Stanford University in Stanford, California. The project initially also involved an unofficial “third founder”, Scott Hassan, the lead programmer who wrote much of the code for the original Google Search engine, but left before Google was officially founded as a company.

Page’s ‘web crawler’ began exploring the web in March 1996, with Page’s own Stanford home page serving as the only starting point.

The first version of Google was released in August 1996 on the Stanford website. It used nearly half of Stanford’s entire network bandwidth.
Source: Wikipedia
Google

#8 Grocery Trading Store (1938)

Grocery Trading Store (1938)

Founders – Lee Byung-chul

First location – Seoul, South Korea

Samsung was founded as a grocery trading store on March 1, 1938, by Lee Byung-Chull. He started his business in Taegu, Korea, trading noodles and other goods produced in and around the city and exporting them to China and its provinces.

After the Korean war and during the country’s push to industrialization, the company successfully expanded into textile-manufacturing.

New subsidiaries such as Samsung Heavy Industries, Samsung Shipbuilding, and Samsung Precision Company soon followed.

Samsung first entered the electronics industry in 1969 with several electronics-focused divisions—their first products were black-and-white televisions. During the 1970s the company began to export home electronics products overseas.
Source: Britannica
Wikipedia,Wikipedia

#9 Automatic Loom (1926)

Automatic Loom (1926)

Founders – Kiichiro Toyoda

First location – Nagoya, Japan

Toyota was founded in 1926 as Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, Ltd. by Sakichi Toyoda, the inventor of a series of manual and machine-powered looms. The most impressive of these was the Toyoda Automatic Loom, Type G, a completely automatic high-speed loom featuring the ability to change shuttles without stopping and dozens of other innovations. At the time it was the world’s most advanced loom, delivering a dramatic improvement in quality and a twenty-fold increase in productivity.

In 2007, this machine was registered as item No. 16 in the Mechanical Engineering Heritage of Japan as “a landmark achievement that advanced the global textile industry and laid the foundation for the development of the Toyota Group.”
Source: Wikipedia
Toyota,Toyota

#10 Memory Chip (1969)

Memory Chip (1969)

Founders – Gordon Moore, Robert Noyce

First location – Mountain View, CA

Intel was founded in Mountain View, California, in 1968 by Gordon E. Moore (known for “Moore’s law”), a chemist, and Robert Noyce, a physicist and co-inventor of the integrated circuit.

When Intel began they did not make processors, as they are famous for now, they made memory. Specifically SRAM, DRAM, and EPROMs. The very first product Intel released, in April of 1969, was the 3101 64-bit SRAM. It was made on the new, and fast Schottky Bipolar process. This made it very fast (access times of 60ns) but very power hungry. It dissipated 525mW, over half a watt, for 64-bits of memory.
Source: The CPU Shack
Intel_africa,wikipedia

More From: Awesome