Rare Albino Hummingbird Also Another Albinos Was Caught On Camera

Grabbing sips and doing the usual hummingbird routine.


Rare Albino Hummingbird Also Another Albinos Was Caught On Camera

It’s flitting so fast you almost can’t tell, but a rare albino hummingbird paid a visit to an Alabama backyard recently — and a sharp-eyed fan captured it on video!

The hummingbird was spotted at a backyard bird feeder near Cordova, a town in north-central Alabama. Local meteorologist James Spann shared the video, sent to him by viewer Deborah Aldridge. In the clip, the white hummingbird zooms around the feeders with a few other birds, grabbing sips and doing the usual hummingbird routine.

According to The Audubon Society, white hummingbirds can either be leucistic (a condition causing a partial loss of pigmentation) or truly albino. Albino birds produce no melanin, meaning their feathers have no color and their eyes are pink or red. Birds with leucism produce melanin, but it doesn’t make it into their feathers properly. The bird experts of Facebook have deemed this hummingbird a true albino, meaning it’s an extremely rare find. Check it out for yourself:

Albino hummingbird at Barney Beach near Cordova… video from Deborah Aldridge

Posted by James Spann on Monday, August 12, 2019

Elsewhere in North America, a woman in Ontario, Canada, encountered not one, but two albino raccoons in late July. Jessica Fontaine was walking her dog with her boyfriend when the trio spotted two light-colored animals on a home’s porch. Initially, Fontaine thought they were looking at cats, but after noticing some typically colored raccoons nearby, she realized she was looking at two “blonde” raccoons.

“They were pretty cute,” Fontaine told the Windsor Star. “They did see me. They looked at me. But then they just kind of went about their business.”

Also in Canada, photographer Mike Yip spied two white ravens in British Columbia earlier this summer. He shared his find with the Vancouver Sun, saying, “We are getting one or two white ravens each year on and off for about 20 years.”

A local researcher told the Sun that local birds inbreeding might account for the frequent sightings of white ravens in the area.

Looks like Mother Nature’s been in rare form this summer!

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