20 Super Cute Animals Even They’re Ugly

But if we abandon beauty stereotypes for a moment, we will see that these animals are not monstrous at all.


20 Super Cute Animals Even They’re Ugly

There are a lot of human beauty standards and, unfortunately, this also applies to animals. People are more likely to save cute and fluffy endangered animals. Ugly animals are actually more attractive for research and a special society was even created to try to protect “ugly” animals. But if we abandon beauty stereotypes for a moment, we will see that these animals are not monstrous at all.

Apegeo wants to show you proof that there are no ugly animals in the world and each creature is beautiful. Maybe you get inspire to make best films with animals.

1. All animals are beautiful.

21 Animals So Ugly They’re Actually Super Cute

2. And we can even envy their cute puffy cheeks,

21 Animals So Ugly They’re Actually Super Cute

3. thick well-groomed beards,

5. and strong teeth.

10. They search for love…

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Romance of the living fossil The purple frog (or pig-nosed frog) spends much of its life underground, emerging briefly for a few days each year at the start of the monsoons to breed. The purple frog is one of only two species in the family Nasikabatrachidae. This family is endemic to the Western Ghats of India and has been evolving independently for around 100 million years. Molecular evidence has found the purple frogs to be most closely related to a family of tiny frogs only found on the Seychelles. It is thought the two families shared a common ancestor that was subsequently isolated on different landmasses following the break up of the supercontinent Gondwana. As it is a fossorial (burrowing) species, the purple frog was long overlooked by science, being formally described in only 2003, despite already having a number of local names. The tadpoles are adapted to living in torrents and have specialised sucker-like mouthparts which they use to cling onto the algae covered rocks where they feed. Local people consume the tadpoles, which are also used alongside the adult frogs for medicinal purposes. In some communities, an amulet is made from the frog and is worn by children as it is believed this will reduce their fear of storms. The purple frog is listed as Endangered by the IUCN Red List, and is threatened by deforestation from expanding cultivation, in addition to consumption and harvesting by local communities. Little is known about this species, but it has very specific breeding sites. Its specialised breeding biology makes it vulnerable to habitat loss and change. The majority of locations where the purple frog is found occur outside the protected area network and some breeding sites have been damaged by the construction of check dams which aim to control water flow during heavy monsoons. #photography #naturephotography #natgeoyourshot #earthcapture #westernghats #edgespecies #iucnredlistofthreatenedspecies #nikon #nikoncoolpix #amphibian #frogs #forest #photooftheday #natureinfocus #bbcearth #natgeo #macrophotography #yourshot #keralaphotos #thewildnation #purplefrog #incredibleindia

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